Marjanes relationship with her parents adventure

Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

Marjane Satrapi tells the story of her life as a child (in part 1) and a young to time to remind myself of the very complex family relationships described at the Her parents try to balance survival as a family with taking part in street while the narrative is shot through with a sense of adventure, of being truly. -After having been verbally harassed Marjane's. mother decides that the time has come for her to. take part in the demonstrations and to stand. Everything you ever wanted to know about Marjane's Father in Persepolis, written by masters of It takes her a long time to change her narrow definition of hero.

Satrapi has a fantastic grandmother, and their relationship is magic.

Adventure Time Another Way Part 01

I have never seen this often-special relationship represented so perfectly. The animation is borderline-psychedelic. The weight of snow on tree branches, steam rising off food, curling iron banisters, bomb blasts, birds twisting around in the air, and single tears running down cheeks are all poetic, and they convey normally indescribable parts of memories, places and time periods.

The story is told as a flashback from her perspective. Spaces meld into one another, time blurs, scenes fade in and out. The movie ends with the audio of a memory in the past. The overall effect is so lush and sensory, and I thought the representation of mental space was a feat.

Persepolis (film) - Wikipedia

It made it easy to digest the historical information. The movie is almost entirely black and white and is full of silhouettes and literal darkness. Certainly, the news had not reached my desert island hermitage that it has been made into a highly successful animated film which I must now make a point of seeing.

Marjane Satrapi tells the story of her life as a child in part 1 and a young adult in part 2 growing up in Iran, and then in exile, and then returning home. This life spans the fall of the Shah and the establishment of the revolutionary regime that replaced his rule.

Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

It is a matter-of-fact, stubborn, brave and often funny account of living in dangerous times and having to grow up too fast. The graphic format is brilliant from several points of view — it reminded me constantly of the persona of the heroine. Her image was always before me, in virtually every frame, as a little girl, then a growing teenager, then an exiled teenager, then a young adult, returning home. The combination of image and words means that the story is conveyed with pace and immediacy.

The emotional punch is shared between image and words, and all the stronger for that.

Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi – Take 2

As it is, the graphic format pulled me along with it, though I had to go back from time to time to remind myself of the very complex family relationships described at the beginning when the scene is being set. Marjane Marji is the only child of prosperous, cosmopolitan parents, secure in their lifestyle under the old regime. The first she knows of change is being told, uncomprehending, to wear a veil to go to school. Her parents try to balance survival as a family with taking part in street protest, their former status a distant dream; but others in their family are not so secure, and several of her male relatives are imprisoned, executed or just disappear.

The author is outstanding at conveying just how much meaning that had for an intelligent child and what she noticed and failed to notice. As Marji grows into her teens, the repression and war footing with Iraq make life unimaginably dangerous for her family and friends. She has to grow up fast, and the risks she and all around her had to run are seared on my mind. She wants clothes and sneakers and music and posters, just like any teenage girl in the West.

She wants to think for herself. Her parents finally can bear it no longer, and to keep her safe, as they think, find a way to send her to Vienna to school. She is 15 years old.